https://youtube.com/watch?v=5IEKSaAWM4Q
THE RESULTS AS OF 9/14/2021 (CHECK BACK FOR UPDATES):

CommonSense Americans Support the

Bipartisan Infrastructure Plan

About Our MembersView BriefView Results

Strong Support for Bipartisan Infrastructure Plan

CommonSense Americans believe that President Biden and the CommonSense Coalition of senators have significantly improved upon the previous plans.

CommonSense Americans' Messages to Congress

Our members were asked, “What would you like to say to your Members of Congress about the proposed infrastructure packages overall?” These are some representative responses.

CommonSense Americans Supporting the Bipartisan Infrastructure Plan

William D.

Democrat, Texas

There are problems with all the plans but I support the Common Sense Coalition plan the most. The Republican plan clearly does not do enough.

J. L.

Independent, Mississippi

In my mind, the Common Sense Coalition Plan strikes the best balance of what most agree is needed and how to pay for it.

Ashley T.

Republican, Florida

David R.

Independent, California

Kevin B.

Republican, Florida

The actual proposals outlined above are accurately reflected in their titles: “Problem Solvers” “Common Sense” vs. the clearly partisan plans. In this very toxic environment, where the very nature of truth is in question, it seems too much to expect a reasonable compromise. Reject hyper partisan politics and work together in a collaborative process of compromise as envisioned by the Founders.

Jacqueline H.

Democrat, California

I feel the Common Sense Coalition Plan is the best solution that includes support from both Democrats and Republicans.

CommonSense Americans Supporting President Biden's Infrastructure Plan

Camille D.

Democrat, New York

I support Pres. Biden’s plan, even modified. We’ve got to go big on this.

Stephanie B.

Independent, Maine

President Biden’s infrastructure package addresses looming costs on the horizon and levels the playing field in how it’s funded. In addition, it commits the funding over a realistic time frame and will assure continuity and security of funding for projects across a change in administrations.

Alek C.

Democrat, California

Biden’s proposed infrastructure package is the only one that even comes remotely close to being adequate in addressing the nation’s needs, and as such, is my choice of an infrastructure package.

CommonSense Americans Supporting the Senate Republican Infrastructure Plan

Gary H.

Republican, Indiana

The GOP senate plan has the $ amount right…

Michelle H.

Independent, Washington

Overall, the Republicans have some good ideas about streamlining permitting processes and maintaining some of the current upward trajectories of infrastructure projects…

Bradley J.

Republican, Arkansas

The Biden Administration is looking to spend too much money on things that are not infrastructure.

Should the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill be Tied to the Reconciliation Bill?

A Strong Bipartisan Majority Says No

Considering Infrastructure on its Own Merits

Some Democrats in Congress say that they will only vote for the bipartisan infrastructure bill if the reconciliation bill with Democratic priorities also passes.

Some Republicans in Congress say the opposite. They will only vote for the bipartisan infrastructure legislation if the Democratic reconciliation bill does NOT pass.

So we asked our members the following question: Do you agree or disagree that the bipartisan infrastructure package should be considered on its own merits without being tied to Democratic priorities legislation?

We also asked specifically about the Democratic and the Republican versions of tying infrastructure to reconciliation.

Opposition to Democratic Linking

Do you agree or disagree with Democrats in Congress who say that they will not vote for bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless separate legislation with Democratic priorities also passes?

76

of Democrats disagree
with Democratic linking

Opposition to Republican Linking

Do you agree or disagree with Republicans in Congress who say that they will not vote for bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless separate legislation with Democratic priorities does not pass?

53

of Republicans disagree
with Republican linking

Opposition to Democratic Linking

Do you agree or disagree with Democrats in Congress who say that they will not vote for bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless separate legislation with Democratic priorities also passes?

76

of Democrats disagree
with Democratic linking

Opposition to Republican Linking

Do you agree or disagree with Republicans in Congress who say that they will not vote for bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless separate legislation with Democratic priorities does not pass?

53

of Republicans disagree
with Republican linking

CommonSense Americans' Messages to Congress

Our members were asked, “What would you like to say to your Members of Congress about whether their support for bipartisan infrastructure legislation should be tied to what happens with the separate legislation for Democratic priorities?” These are some representative responses.

CommonSense Americans who Oppose Linking the Reconciliation Package to the Infrastructure Plan

Fred H.

Republican, West Virginia

Politics as usual needs to stop. This move mentioned above sounds like “bullying” and threatening. “Quid Pro Quo” if you will. I see the Republicans are doing this too. All parties need to cease this behavior, and, act like Lawmakers, not bullying and blackmailing coworkers. This IS CONGRESSIONAL LEVEL negotiations, not a third grade playground!

Kathleen R.

Democrat, Arizona

The bipartisan infrastructure legislation should not be tied to other legislation being considered. Again, can Members of Congress please stop playing politics with the welfare of the United States. These are agreements made in a bipartisan manner and are urgently needed. The Republicans in the US Senate had no problem changing the rules to gain more justices on the Supreme Court who favor their views in the past. If all Democratic Members of Congress from very diverse states and backgrounds can agree on legislation, that should be their right to pursue and vote on the legislation.

John R.

Independent, Ohio

Cindy P.

Democrat, Michigan

This nation would be so much stronger, so much better, and the people so much happier if decisions were made based on the merits of the issue at hand. So much wrong has been done to this nation by tying a bad decision to a good one, and forcing through the wrong actions as a condition of doing another thing right. Instead, why not try looking at each issue, each decision on its own merits and making a lot more good decisions… in the things you choose that we do and the things that you choose we do not do. By tying so much bad legislation to the good legislation, all you do is a lot of mediocre work – kind of like our C- infrastructure. Think big; shoot for an A, why not.

Michelle G.

Independent, Alaska

Noah L.

Republican, Rhode Island

Vote for the package in front of you. Don’t hold it hostage because it isn’t 100% of what you want. Something is better than nothing. As long as it is responsible and productive legislation then that is what matters.

Michael B.

Democrat, Arizona

Stuart C.

Independent, Idaho

If compromise has been reached in the creation of the infrastructure legislation, then efforts to tie votes for it to actions on other legislation reflects a lack of integrity and a lack of understanding for the importance of compromise.

Mark M.

Independent, Georgia

The bills should be considered separate, it seems petty to purposefully vote against something that you would otherwise support just for political game playing. Getting 60 votes to simply open debate seems like common sense, vote on the merits after that. If the minority party wont even allow things to be debated as a tool to subvert a vote on something that would otherwise have a majority of the body overall vote for, then what fairness does the rule even provide when it’s being abused and not being used in good faith.

Jonathan N.

Republican, Wisconsin

The reason why spending has gone out of control in the US is because issues unrelated to the bills being considered always find their way in. Too often bills that I would support get ruined by things that have no right to be considered with it. If something is a good idea it shouldn’t have to be snuck in with other good bills just to pass. Most issues should be broken up into separate bills with the exception to sometimes issues need certain things to happen to be effective.

Vanessa P.

Democrat, Arkansas

Supporting/Not supporting bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless the separate legislation fails/passes is like sinking one of your ships because another one has already sunk.

Joy V.

Republican, Arizona

Any priorities which any congress member finds desirable, but is not infrastructure, should be presented in its own bill. Then it can pass or fail on its own merit.

CommonSense Americans who Support Republicans in Congress who say that they will not vote for bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless separate legislation with Democratic priorities does not pass.

Darrin C.

Republican, Indiana

Normally, I would support the consideration of legislation on its own merits, such as the bipartisan infrastructure proposals. However, the Democratic proposal that they propose to pass through remediation is destructive and should be opposed at all costs… It proposes spending that is at the level of what the entire Federal budget was pre-COVID. It also would fundamentally change the nature of the relationship between the citizen and the Federal Government. Not to mention there is no way one can tie much of this to any Constitutionally enumerated power. I oppose legislation that substantially increases the role of the Federal Government in the daily lives of its citizens. Our Constitutional system was intended to have a limited role for the Federal Government. We have moved past that long ago – I believe in the transfer of power back to the States – so I certainly oppose further expansion. Therefore, even though I do wish to see an infrastructure bill pass, I am in the minority who agree to withhold support if such support also enables the far larger partisan package that the Democrats wish to push through.

Patricia C.

Republican, Vermont

Any bills that call for an increase in spending should be considered within the context of all spending bills.

CommonSense Americans who Support Democrats in Congress who say that they will not vote for bipartisan infrastructure legislation unless separate legislation with Democratic priorities also passes

Camille D.

Democrat, New York

I support Speaker Pelosi’s plan not to support the bipartisan infrastructure plan without passing the legislation which includes childcare, paid leave, universal preschool, free community college, and corporate tax measures. Biden campaigned on some of this. He must keep his campaign promises.

Eric A.

Other, Illinois

It’s precisely the small-minded thinking that has caused this current state of affairs…we need to create the conditions where all of our residents have the tools they need to succeed. That includes such things as childcare, provisions for the disabled (since we are all only temporarily-abled), eldercare, good schools, healthcare, affordable housing, and living wages. All of these things provide the infrastructure that the rich take having access to for granted, yet are denied to too many Americans.

Darlene J.

Democrat, Arizona

The Republicans never support the people. We have to pass legislation for the people. This can not be about corporations and the wealthy getting richer. If we only pass the Infrastructure the Republicans want then that is exactly what will happen. The Republicans will get richer off the backs of the people. They have made us slaves and it has to stop. People can not afford to live so why should they work. It has to be all inclusive of a package or the Republicans will make sure the other legislation is dead on arrival.

Top Pay Fors

with greater than two-thirds support

While the question of how to pay for increased infrastructure spending has been a challenging one in Congress, it is easy to find several funding sources that get broad support from the American people.

61% Oppose Deficit Spending

While the question of how to pay for increased infrastructure spending has been a challenging one in Congress, it is easy to find several funding sources that get broad support from the American people.

61% Oppose Deficit Spending

While the question of how to pay for increased infrastructure spending has been a challenging one in Congress, it is easy to find several funding sources that get broad support from the American people.

61% Oppose Deficit Spending

CommonSense Americans' Messages to Congress

Our members were asked, “What would you like to say to your Members of Congress about how to pay for increased infrastructure investments?” These are some representative responses.

Kathleen R.

Democrat, Arizona

Ashley T.

Republican, Florida

Kasey L.

Republican, Washington

Corporate tax rates in America are the lowest they have been since the 30s. It is also a lower percentage of our GDP than it has been since the 30s. Meanwhile billionaires are taking pleasure trips to space funded largely by their corporate profits. Since corporations are people when it comes to constitutional rights, they should have the same responsibility to fund our government as people do.

Natalie C.

Independent, Arkansas

The U.S. Department of Treasury cites Office of Management and Budget data showing that the corporate share of federal tax revenue has decreased from about 28% in 1950 to about 7% in 2019. Over that same period, workers’ share has increased from about 50% to about 85%. Put taxes on the corporations and the wealthy and lessen the burden on workers!

Jay R.

Democrat, South Dakota

Emily

Independent, New York

The IRS needs to be funded appropriately so it can do its job. Corporations and Wealthy Americans need to pay their fair share of taxes. No more tax cuts for the rich and corporations. The pandemic is not over the funds issued to states may still be needed. The military budget is too large. That can be cut too to help pay for where we are in need here at home. Increase taxes especially for fossil fuel companies rather than working Americans who already struggle with rising gas and car prices. If lobbying cannot yet be abolished then tax the lobbyists too for the privilege of disenfranchising the American electorate in behalf of corporations and other wealthy clients.

Reduce Total Spending

Annual New Spending

While the Bipartisan Plan gets the broadest support, most Americans who get deeply informed believe the total spending amount should be reduced.

Bipartisan Plan

110
Billion

*On July 29th the Bipartisan Proposal’s overall new annual spending was reduced by $6 billion. 

Average Recommended by CommonSense Americans

70.2
Billion

Top Six Categories Where

CommonSense Americans Suggest Lower New Annual Spending Amounts